Making Excuses, Compromising Integrity

There is plenty of evidence from the field of criminology that rationalizations — excuses, basically — play a major role in wrongdoing. People generally do know the difference between right and wrong. But certain people, in certain settings, find ways to tell themselves that this bad thing they’re about to do — something they know isn’t right, is actually OK, at least for them, at least this time.

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LINK: Six Dangerous Excuses To Compromise That Could Land You In Prison (by Ron Carucci for Forbes)

…If you are thinking, as did Richard, “I would never cross that line,” you may be at the greatest risk of doing so. We all find ourselves edging close to lines we think we wouldn’t cross. How far to “stretch the truth” on a resume. How much to embellish results to your boss. How much to pad that expense report or your tax return. Slippery slopes are the most dangerous when we conclude we’re not at risk of sliding down them. Whether you are a sales professional trying make quota in regions known for corrupt business practices, or you are vying for a significantly competitive job, temptations to compromise our integrity and rationalize doing so are plentiful. If you’ve ever used, or even thought, any of the six following justifications, heed Richard’s stark warning, take responsibility for rationalizing, and back away from that line…..

What do you think?


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