Monthly Archives: June 2015

The Pope: Wrong About Market-Based Solutions

In his recent encyclical, Pope Francis argued against market-based approaches to environmental problems. Here is philosopher Joseph Heath explaining what’s wrong with that claim. It’s a short opinion piece, and well worth reading in its entirety. >>> LINK: Pope Francis’

The Pope: Wrong About Market-Based Solutions

In his recent encyclical, Pope Francis argued against market-based approaches to environmental problems. Here is philosopher Joseph Heath explaining what’s wrong with that claim. It’s a short opinion piece, and well worth reading in its entirety. >>> LINK: Pope Francis’

Walmart Tax Avoidance

The organization behind this study is far from impartial. But that doesn’t mean the report is not reliable. And note that there’s no claim here that Walmart is doing anything illegal. The key question, of course, is whether it is

Walmart Tax Avoidance

The organization behind this study is far from impartial. But that doesn’t mean the report is not reliable. And note that there’s no claim here that Walmart is doing anything illegal. The key question, of course, is whether it is

Pope on Climate & Capitalism (with a lousy bibliography)

People have made a big deal about the Pope’s new encyclical on climate. Papal writings are generally a big deal, of course, given that there are about 1.2 billion Roman Catholics in the world. But this one is seen as

Pope on Climate & Capitalism (with a lousy bibliography)

People have made a big deal about the Pope’s new encyclical on climate. Papal writings are generally a big deal, of course, given that there are about 1.2 billion Roman Catholics in the world. But this one is seen as

Benefit Corporations: Why Do Some US States, But Not Others, Have Legislation?

Benefit corporations are an interesting new (or mostly new) type of business entity, one with a dual public and private mission. Many people find such organizations extremely attractive. Some even think they are the “way of the future.” The blog

Benefit Corporations: Why Do Some US States, But Not Others, Have Legislation?

Benefit corporations are an interesting new (or mostly new) type of business entity, one with a dual public and private mission. Many people find such organizations extremely attractive. Some even think they are the “way of the future.” The blog

Are there countries where doing business responsibly is impossible?

This blog entry asks whether there are some developing countries where companies from ‘western’ countries can’t do business without ethical peril. Are there some countries that should be considered “no-go” zones by responsible companies? >>> LINK: When is a country

Are there countries where doing business responsibly is impossible?

This blog entry asks whether there are some developing countries where companies from ‘western’ countries can’t do business without ethical peril. Are there some countries that should be considered “no-go” zones by responsible companies? >>> LINK: When is a country

Canada’s Most Socially-Responsible Companies

Whenever you see a headline like this, always always ask yourself 2 questions: 1) What do they mean by “Socially Responsible”? and 2) What was their methodology for producing their list? >>> LINK: Canada’s top 50 socially responsible corporations: 2015

Canada’s Most Socially-Responsible Companies

Whenever you see a headline like this, always always ask yourself 2 questions: 1) What do they mean by “Socially Responsible”? and 2) What was their methodology for producing their list? >>> LINK: Canada’s top 50 socially responsible corporations: 2015

Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

If you think that self-driving automobiles present only a technological challenge, you’re not thinking hard enough. They present an ethical challenge as well. Ought a self-driving car’s algorithm to treat its passengers as objects of fiduciary care (acting so as

Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

If you think that self-driving automobiles present only a technological challenge, you’re not thinking hard enough. They present an ethical challenge as well. Ought a self-driving car’s algorithm to treat its passengers as objects of fiduciary care (acting so as

Does a Corporation Have a Mind?

Corporations don’t have brains, but do they have minds? Or to put it in the lingo of philosophers and neuroscientists, do corporations have ‘mental states?’ Or, instead, when we say “Apple wants our money,” are we simply using a metaphor,

Does a Corporation Have a Mind?

Corporations don’t have brains, but do they have minds? Or to put it in the lingo of philosophers and neuroscientists, do corporations have ‘mental states?’ Or, instead, when we say “Apple wants our money,” are we simply using a metaphor,

It’s Not Wrong if You Do it For Money

In their forthcoming book, Markets Without Limits, Peter Jaworski and Jason Brennan argue that if it’s not wrong to do X for free, it’s not wrong to do it for money. Here, a Japanese judge has ruled that it might

It’s Not Wrong if You Do it For Money

In their forthcoming book, Markets Without Limits, Peter Jaworski and Jason Brennan argue that if it’s not wrong to do X for free, it’s not wrong to do it for money. Here, a Japanese judge has ruled that it might

Should Companies (and Managers) Work for Shareholders?

This short piece is essential reading. It succinctly sums up the challenge posed by the question of ‘shareholder primacy’ — that is, the question of whether “shareholders come first” from the point of view of corporate objectives, and just what

Should Companies (and Managers) Work for Shareholders?

This short piece is essential reading. It succinctly sums up the challenge posed by the question of ‘shareholder primacy’ — that is, the question of whether “shareholders come first” from the point of view of corporate objectives, and just what