Monthly Archives: October 2015

Wrongdoing: Evil, or Incompetence, or Both?

The piece below suggests a link — or a pattern, at least — connecting unethical behaviour with poor management. Of course, it’s just a hypothesis. Is supported by provocative anecdotes, but the tightness of the connection and the direction of

Wrongdoing: Evil, or Incompetence, or Both?

The piece below suggests a link — or a pattern, at least — connecting unethical behaviour with poor management. Of course, it’s just a hypothesis. Is supported by provocative anecdotes, but the tightness of the connection and the direction of

Is Wil Wheaton right? DO you deserve to get paid for those blog posts?

Actor Will Wheaton recently posted a piece about his anger over having been asked by HuffPo to to let them publish, for free, something he had written. Wheaton’s ire also resulted in a string of tweets, like this one: “Writers

Is Wil Wheaton right? DO you deserve to get paid for those blog posts?

Actor Will Wheaton recently posted a piece about his anger over having been asked by HuffPo to to let them publish, for free, something he had written. Wheaton’s ire also resulted in a string of tweets, like this one: “Writers

Employment Ethics: On-Call Scheduling of Hourly Labor

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has gone after several retailers for the employment practice of on-call scheduling—demanding as a condition of employment that workers be available to work during specified hours, but paying workers only for the hours

Employment Ethics: On-Call Scheduling of Hourly Labor

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has gone after several retailers for the employment practice of on-call scheduling—demanding as a condition of employment that workers be available to work during specified hours, but paying workers only for the hours

The Experimental Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

Despite its hyperbolic title, this piece in the MIT Technology Review (which includes a link to the ungated research paper) is interesting both because it reports attempts to bring experimental ethics to bear on the normative applied ethics of self-driving

The Experimental Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

Despite its hyperbolic title, this piece in the MIT Technology Review (which includes a link to the ungated research paper) is interesting both because it reports attempts to bring experimental ethics to bear on the normative applied ethics of self-driving

Daraprim Price Hike Got You Down? Competition to the Rescue

Well, that didn’t take long. Turing Pharamaceuticals’ attempt to cash in on de facto (though not de jure) monopoly status as a provider of Daraprim has elicited competition from Imprimis, which aims to offer Daraprim users a close substitute for

Daraprim Price Hike Got You Down? Competition to the Rescue

Well, that didn’t take long. Turing Pharamaceuticals’ attempt to cash in on de facto (though not de jure) monopoly status as a provider of Daraprim has elicited competition from Imprimis, which aims to offer Daraprim users a close substitute for

Scandals Shouldn’t Provoke Cynicism About Ethics

The piece below essentially suggests that scandals, rather than depressing us about the state of business, should inspire us to work harder — to work with business — to help them integrate ethics into their operations. >>> LINK: Don’t Get

Scandals Shouldn’t Provoke Cynicism About Ethics

The piece below essentially suggests that scandals, rather than depressing us about the state of business, should inspire us to work harder — to work with business — to help them integrate ethics into their operations. >>> LINK: Don’t Get

CEI: There’s Less Corruption In Business Than You Think

If the data show rent-seeking behavior by firms to be so effective, why don’t firms do more of it? This white paper from the Competitive Enterprise Institute is interesting because it encourages public choice economists to explore (as the authors

CEI: There’s Less Corruption In Business Than You Think

If the data show rent-seeking behavior by firms to be so effective, why don’t firms do more of it? This white paper from the Competitive Enterprise Institute is interesting because it encourages public choice economists to explore (as the authors